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New Zealand’s Specialist
Project Lawyers

There is a marked difference

in the way Greenwood Roche operates. From the outset we have focused on clearly defined specialist areas, retaining highly respected legal experts in each field. We then take that further; ensuring clients have direct and regular access to the most senior partners and lawyers, in a cost efficient manner.

Close contact with experts and clear cost advantages

We advise on a range of significant public and private sector projects. To ensure our specialists are always where they’re needed, we operate as one office with hubs in Auckland, Wellington & Christchurch.

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Recent Projects

Projects

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Greenwood Roche has assisted Mighty River Power with the procurement and negotiation...

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Recent Projects

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Greenwood Roche has assisted Mighty River Power with the procurement and negotiation of contracts for its plant refurbishment project at Aratiatia


Austria-based Andritz was awarded the contract to provide work on three generating units at the 78-MW Aratiatia hydroelectric station.

The Greenwood Roche team for this project comprised partner Barry Walker and special counsel Adrian Doherty.  Barry and Adrian are experienced international construction project lawyers, comfortable using a variety of international standard documents, including FIDIC, to assist in smooth cross-border negotiations.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Mitre 10 Support Centre

Greenwood Roche assisted Mitre 10 with its new head office project in Auckland...

Recent Projects


Mitre 10 Support Centre

Greenwood Roche assisted Mitre 10 with its new head office project in Auckland


Greenwood Roche acted for Mitre 10 in respect of the procurement and engagement of the contractor and consultant team for its new head office and support centre in Albany.

The facility will comprise approximately 7,000 m² at 65-67 Corinthian Drive, Albany, Auckland. It is being developed by Mitre 10 itself and is due for completion in late 2016.

The Greenwood Roche team for the project included partner Barry Walker and special counsel Adrian Doherty.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal...

Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity...

Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

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New National Head Office for Ministry of Education

Greenwood Roche represented the Ministry of Education on the redevelopment and 15...

New National Head Office for Ministry of Education

Recent Projects

New National Head Office for Ministry of Education

New National Head Office for Ministry of Education

Greenwood Roche represented the Ministry of Education on the redevelopment and 15 year lease of the Ministry’s new national head office at 33 Bowen Street, Wellington.


At approximately 13,100m2, the Bowen Street transaction was a full building lease and one of the largest commercial office leasing deals in New Zealand for the year. Greenwood Roche assisted the Ministry on all aspects of the negotiation and documents for the transaction, which included substantial refurbishment works, a seismic upgrade for the building and an integrated fitout.

The Greenwood Roche team for the deal were partner Jeannie Warnock and principal Doran Wyatt, both based in Wellington.
 


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment – New National Office Redevelopment

Recent Projects

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment – New National Office Redevelopment

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment – New National Office Redevelopment

At over 20,000m2 of space, the redevelopment of a landmark Wellington building has provided the New Zealand Government’s largest Ministry with a substantial new National Office.


Greenwood Roche has successfully assisted the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment in the redevelopment and lease of MBIE’s new National Office premises in Wellington.
 
Greenwood Roche has continued to provide advice to MBIE throughout the course of the redevelopment, including assisting with the sale of the building to an NZX-listed property investment company during the project.
 
MBIE’s new National Office is one of a number of substantial redevelopment projects within Wellington on which Greenwood Roche has acted.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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New National Head Office for Transpower

Recent Projects


New National Head Office for Transpower

Greenwood Roche represented Transpower New Zealand Limited in relation to the redevelopment and lease of Transpower’s future national head office at Boulcott Street, Wellington.


Transpower plans, builds, maintains and operates New Zealand’s high voltage electricity transmission network. The new premises will house around 500 staff and the 24/7 control room for the National Grid.  At approximately 8,400m2, the Boulcott Street transaction is one of the largest commercial office leasing deals in New Zealand this year.

The Greenwood Roche team included partner John Greenwood and principal Doran Wyatt, both based in the firm’s Wellington office.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Redevelopment of 56 The Terrace, Wellington

Recent Projects


Redevelopment of 56 The Terrace, Wellington

Kiwi Income Property Trust, one of the country’s largest listed property investors, is undertaking a $67 million redevelopment of its property at 56 The Terrace, Wellington, for lease by the Ministry of Social Development.


We are advising Kiwi Income Property Trust on this project. Our work has included advising on the development agreement and the 18 year deed of lease with the Crown and preparing and advising on the construction contract for the development works.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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New Co-located Processing facility in Palmerston North

Recent Projects


New Co-located Processing facility in Palmerston North

New Zealand Post has recently commenced operations at its new Manawatu Co-located Processing Facility.


Comprising over 7,000 square metres including a mail processing warehouse, staging interchange areas, and associated office accommodation (and a combined investment of over $10 million), the facility houses NZ Post’s mail processing functions for the entire lower North Island.

The facility is situated in the heart of Palmerston North’s main industrial area, and is strategically convenient to all major transport systems in the city (including the airport, state highways and rail network).

Greenwood Roche assisted NZ Post on the development, construction and leasing aspects of the facility. The development agreement provided for delivery of tenant works as a variation to the landlord's main contract and early engagement of the Main Contractor on a fixed margin open book basis. Both features enabled the project to be completed seamlessly to a tight schedule while maintaining the appropriate distribution of risk and responsibility between the parties.
 


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Watercare’s new head office

Recent Projects

Watercare’s new head office

Watercare’s new head office

Watercare Services Limited is responsible for providing water and wastewater services to the greater Auckland region, and employs a large number of people across many different teams.


We acted for Watercare in relation to its new head office premises located in Newmarket, Auckland. This was a significant project, involving the negotiation of a comprehensive redevelopment agreement and subsequent deed of lease, and further extensive advice in relation to Watercare’s ability to terminate its existing tenancies at that time.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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New Co-located Processing facility in Palmerston North

New Zealand Post has recently commenced operations at its new Manawatu Co-located...

Recent Projects


New Co-located Processing facility in Palmerston North

New Zealand Post has recently commenced operations at its new Manawatu Co-located Processing Facility.


Comprising over 7,000 square metres including a mail processing warehouse, staging interchange areas, and associated office accommodation (and a combined investment of over $10 million), the facility houses NZ Post’s mail processing functions for the entire lower North Island.

The facility is situated in the heart of Palmerston North’s main industrial area, and is strategically convenient to all major transport systems in the city (including the airport, state highways and rail network).

Greenwood Roche assisted NZ Post on the development, construction and leasing aspects of the facility. The development agreement provided for delivery of tenant works as a variation to the landlord's main contract and early engagement of the Main Contractor on a fixed margin open book basis. Both features enabled the project to be completed seamlessly to a tight schedule while maintaining the appropriate distribution of risk and responsibility between the parties.
 


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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New National Head Office for Transpower

Greenwood Roche represented Transpower New Zealand Limited in relation to the redevelopment...

Recent Projects


New National Head Office for Transpower

Greenwood Roche represented Transpower New Zealand Limited in relation to the redevelopment and lease of Transpower’s future national head office at Boulcott Street, Wellington.


Transpower plans, builds, maintains and operates New Zealand’s high voltage electricity transmission network. The new premises will house around 500 staff and the 24/7 control room for the National Grid.  At approximately 8,400m2, the Boulcott Street transaction is one of the largest commercial office leasing deals in New Zealand this year.

The Greenwood Roche team included partner John Greenwood and principal Doran Wyatt, both based in the firm’s Wellington office.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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New Paraparaumu Substation

Transpower New Zealand Limited recently commissioned the new 220 kV substation at...

New Paraparaumu Substation

Recent Projects

New Paraparaumu Substation

New Paraparaumu Substation

Transpower New Zealand Limited recently commissioned the new 220 kV substation at Paraparaumu, providing additional electricity capacity to the Kapiti Coast.


Greenwood Roche advised Transpower on the property rights required for the new 220kV transmission lines to connect the substation to the existing electricity grid, and on the removal of the existing 110kV lines running from Paraparaumu along the proposed route of the Transmission Gully Motorway.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Electricity upgrades

Recent Projects

Electricity upgrades

Electricity upgrades

The national electricity grid is owned by the State-owned enterprise, Transpower New Zealand, with lower voltage distribution lines owned by a range of locally and publicly owned entities.


Greenwood Roche advises Transpower on all property aspects relating to the national grid including the new 400kV-capable transmission line between Whakamaru, in south Waikato, and Auckland.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Major new transmission line

Recent Projects


Major new transmission line

Transpower is currently constructing the new 220kV transmission line connecting Wairakei and Whakamaru, assisting with the development of renewable electricity generation around Taupo.


Greenwood Roche has acted for Transpower on the acquisition of property rights for this project. Our work has included the acquisition of easements, Maori land issues, advice on compulsory acquisition rights, emissions trading issues and compensation entitlements.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Top Energy’s new transmission lines

Recent Projects

Top Energy’s new transmission lines

Top Energy’s new transmission lines

Top Energy Limited supplies electricity to the Far North region and is improving its infrastructure network to increase capacity, security and reliability.


Greenwood Roche is advising Top Energy Limited on several new electricity transmission line projects,in particular the new 110kV lines from Kaikohe to Wiroa and from Wiroa to Kaitaia. Our work includes strategic advice, acquisition of land property rights, Maori land issues, compulsory acquisition, compensation entitlements and forestry issues.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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News & Insights

Insights

From Recovery to Regeneration: Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016

At midnight on 18 April 2016, the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011 (CER Act) expired...

News & Insights

From Recovery to Regeneration: Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016

At midnight on 18 April 2016, the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011 (CER Act) expired, making way for a new phase of the rebuild of Greater Christchurch following the 2010/2011 earthquakes.


The Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016 (Act) became fully operative on 19 April 2016.  The Act is the primary legislation responsible for transitioning the rebuild from a phase of recovery to regeneration.

The summary below provides a snapshot of the major elements of the Act.  For further information, please follow the link below or contact one of our team.

Recovery to Regeneration

• Area of Application
One of the Act’s first significant departures from the CER Act is a revised geographical area of application.  As demonstrated in the map below Greater Christchurch is now significantly smaller than the area defined in the CER Act. 



 • Recovery to Regeneration
“Recovery” under the CER Act attracted a wide definition allowing CERA to assist in projects beyond the physical rebuild and redevelopment of the region. 
Under the new Act, “regeneration” has a distinctly narrower focus being almost inextricably tied to the practical function of rebuilding, “urban renewal” (which is also defined by reference to rebuilding), and development. “Restoration and enhancement” is still included in the definition of regeneration but it attracts a lesser focus.  The new phase is targeted, reflecting the evolution (and consequently, reduction) of the role of central government in assisting with less physically tangible forms of recovery.  The Act does not signal the end of those forms, but rather shifts the emphasis toward the more physically tangible “regeneration”.  

• Section 11
Subject to the above, many of the powers in the CER Act have been carried over to the new Act, including the ability for the appropriate individual to:

• carry out or commission works including the erection, replacement, demolition of all or part of any building on private or public land, with or without the consent of the owners;
• erect and use temporary buildings on any land (including private land) without building or resource consent, or the consent of the owner;
• prohibit access to any specified area, close or stop roads;
• direct owners to act for the benefit of adjoining owners;
• acquire land (either by agreement or compulsory acquisition);
• subdivide, amalgamate land;
• hold, mortgage and lease land acquired under this Act or the CER Act; or
• compensate for actual loss where land is compulsorily acquired.

Section 11 of the Act requires that the exercise of many of these powers must be in accordance with at least one of the purposes set out in section 3.  Similar to the CER Act, section 11(2) requires that a Minister or chief executive may only exercise or claim a power, right or privilege under the Act, where he or she reasonably considers it necessary. 

However, section 11 does not apply to, or has limited application in respect of, certain exercises of power.  These powers relate to the commissioning of works, erection of temporary buildings and the purchase (though not compulsory acquisition), amalgamation or disposal of land. 

This is a potentially significant shift from the position in the CER Act where the purposes of the Act had to be met for each exercise of power, and the Minister or chief executive had to reasonably consider that the exercise of power was necessary.  Arguably, excluding the application of section 11 enables the exercise of these specific powers by the chief executive or the Minister without reference to either of those requirements.

Although the courts are unlikely to look favourably on any overtly indiscriminate use of these quite extensive powers, arguably one of the major tools in keeping a check on the use of these powers has been quite substantially altered by the new Act 

• Status of Recovery Plans
The following Recovery Plans have been included in Act:

• Central City Recovery Plan;
• Land Use Recovery Plan;
• Residential Red Zone Offer Recovery Plan;
• Lyttelton Port Recovery Plan.
• From its notification in the Gazette, the Waimakariri Residential Red Zone Recovery Plan.

Because Recovery Plans are explicitly defined in the Act, and their functions are also clearly set out (i.e. Councils cannot act inconsistently with them when making certain decisions, they can be amended or revoked), they continue in effect in so far as they are described by the Act.

• Recognition of local leadership
The extent of the central government’s role (and consequently the role of local leadership) in the planning and implementation of the rebuild, has been an ongoing source of tension, particularly in the last couple of years.  One of the key functions of the Act is to recognise and provide opportunities for local leadership to contribute to decision-making under the Act.  This is principally in the form of governance of the new Regenerate Christchurch entity and by virtue of being a “proponent” for the purposes of proposing; developing or amending a Regeneration Plan or making changes to RMA documents.

Under section 42, the Minister to suspend, amend or revoke an RMA document, plan or policy under the Local Government Act 2002, a regional land transport plan, management plans under the Conservation Act 1987 and the Reserves Act 1987, or a bylaw made under any Act.  As with many of the powers in the Act, the powers afforded to the Minister in section 42 are almost entirely carried over from the CER Act. 
The major omission is that the Minister may no longer modify resource consents.  In addition, in our view, section 42(1) indicates that the Minister may not exercise a power under section 42 unless the exercise of such power has been proposed by a proponent. This is a significant shift. 

 Regenerate Christchurch
As set out previously, Regenerate Christchurch is the new entity established under the Act to:
• lead regeneration in the area of Christchurch district;
• engage and advocate effectively with communities, stakeholders and decision makers to achieve its purpose; and
• work collaboratively with others in achieving regeneration.
The diagram below gives a overview of the intended relationship between Regenerate Christchurch and the other key regeneration entities.




• What’s Missing
Two powers under the CER Act are missing, namely, the ability for the Governor General to make Orders in Council, and the power of the chief executive to delegate his or her powers to any employee or person seconded to CERA.  Both of these powers were utilised widely under the CER Act.  Their removal is a further indication that the rebuild is entering a phase where Crown-led actions are not required to the extent and/or frequency they once were.

• Repeal and Survival
As well as the repeal of the CER Act, almost all of the Orders in Councils made under section 71 of the CER Act, the Recovery Strategy and the Transition Recovery Plan are revoked by the Act. 

Those that continue in force as specified in Schedule 7 of the Act are amended in the manner specified in that Schedule.  Those Orders in Council are the:

• Canterbury Earthquake (Christchurch Replacement District Plan) Order 2014;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Earthquake Commission Act) Order 2012;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Historic Places Act) Order 2011;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Local Government Act 2002 – Retaining Walls) Order 2013;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Rating) Order 2012;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Reserves Legislation) Order (No 2) 2011;
• Canterbury Earthquake (Resource Management Act – Burwood Resource Recovery Park) Order 2011; and
• Canterbury Earthquake (Resource Management Act Permitted Activities) Order 2011.


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Foreign Investment Insights

We hope that the Foreign Investment Insight series will assist overseas investors to...

Foreign Investment Insights

News & Insights

Foreign Investment Insights

We hope that the Foreign Investment Insight series will assist overseas investors to gain practical, useful knowledge of the key features of commercial real estate transactions in New Zealand. We expect the series will also be useful to local vendors seeking to position assets for sale to overseas investors, as it provides guidance on best practice and foreign investor expectations. Each issue in the series focusses on a different area relevant to overseas investment in commercial Kiwi property.



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Auckland Unitary Plan

There has been considerable media interest in the recent stoush over the Auckland Unitary...

Auckland Unitary Plan

News & Insights

Auckland Unitary Plan

Auckland Unitary Plan

There has been considerable media interest in the recent stoush over the Auckland Unitary Plan. Below is a short update on the current situation and some thoughts on how it has come to this. We’ll be updating this periodically to keep you informed.


What is the Unitary Plan?
The Unitary Plan will have a significant effect on future development in Auckland.  It will be of concern to all those with an interest in property, whether that be the everyday Aucklander shocked at NZ Herald’s claim that high-rises will be built in their backyard or those concerned that without it the prospect of getting on the property ladder is becoming more and more distant.
 
The Unitary Plan is in part a result of the recent(ish) restructure of Auckland local government, billed as the creation of the “super-city”.  As part of that restructure, Auckland Council became a unitary authority (both a local and regional council) with jurisdiction over the whole Auckland region from around Wellsford down to the Bombay Hills (where NZ begins).  To create one combined plan for all of Auckland (and to avoid the lengthy delay that generally accompanies a new District or Regional Plan process), the Local Government (Auckland Transitional Provisions) Act 2010 set out a special process for Council with an Independent Hearings Panel (the Panel) to follow, rather than use the standard plan-creation procedure in the Resource Management Act 1991.
 
That process involved the Council putting together a Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (the PAUP), inviting submissions (and further submissions) and the Panel conducting a series of hearings on various aspects of the Unitary Plan.  Those hearings are ongoing.  The Panel has a statutory deadline of 22 July 2016 to complete the hearings and issue its final recommendations.
 
Council then has 20 working days to decide to accept or reject the recommendations (although the case law tends to create some difficulty for a council deciding not to follow the recommendation of the panel which heard the evidence).  Council must then publicly notify both the Panel’s recommendations and its own decisions.  The Unitary Plan is then deemed approved/adopted, subject to limited rights of submitters to appeal to the Environment Court.  The appeal process is designed to incentivise the Council to accept the Panel’s recommendations (in which case there is no right of appeal to the Environment Court).
 
So, what happened recently that hit the news?
The current stoush is to do with the Panel’s hearings into Topic 081: Rezoning and Precincts – Geographical Areas.  In November, the Council decided (through its Unitary Plan Committee) on a preliminary position going into the hearings.  (In the hearings, the Council is in the same position as any other submitter – it must produce evidence to support its position.)  As part of that preliminary position, Council filed extensive evidence with the Panel and released preliminary zoning maps.  The zoning maps basically “upzoned” certain parts of Auckland from the PAUP, particularly along key transport routes.  For example, Mixed Housing Urban (three storeys allowed) went from 10.91% to 16.89%.  This elicited allegations of high-rises in backyards.
 
It seems that the rationale behind the changes was a general concern that the PAUP wouldn’t actually allow enough development to take place in Auckland.  During the Council’s own submissions process, the PAUP had been watered down so much that it really wasn’t going to allow for the sort of intensification Council and the Government say is needed in Auckland.
 
Council described the changes in its preliminary position as “out of scope” as they weren’t included in the PAUP and so most of the landowners whose properties were being “upzoned” hadn’t asked for the changes.  Auckland 2040 (a lobby group concerned at haphazard intensification) has been quite scathing on the process, arguing there has been a breach of natural justice and the democratic process.
 
After much political pressure, Council held an extraordinary meeting at the end of February where they voted to withdraw the evidence suggesting these changes.
 
Were the changes really out of scope?
Not according to Housing NZ.  Housing NZ submitted to the Panel that the changes were in fact “in scope” as many submitters, including Housing NZ, had asked for significant upzoning on the basis that the PAUP didn’t allow for sufficient development.  It was then entirely open to Council to be cognisant of those requests and to produce evidence at the hearing which supported that position.  It was however, perhaps, not the way most conducive to keeping constituents on side.  Certainly, it would have been more appropriate had the Council included the additional areas intended for higher-density development in the PAUP.  Submitters would then have had a more transparent opportunity to submit on such matters. 
 
What happens next?
Following the extraordinary meeting, Council’s lawyers asked the Panel to “withdraw in part” the various evidence filed.  The evidence couldn’t be withdrawn in full because it is relied on for other parts of Council’s position which still stands, and with hearings starting so soon after the extraordinary meeting the evidence couldn’t be re-filed.  Council’s lawyers were also concerned that its own planners, called as “expert witnesses”, would be put in an “untenable position” as they would not be able to comply with the standards required of expert witnesses and still support the Council’s resolution (as, presumably, the zoning changes are needed).
 
The Panel’s response has put Council in an uneasy position.  The Panel refused to withdraw the evidence and said that it could be adopted by other submitters (there are suggestions the Government, perhaps through Housing NZ, might adopt the evidence and that seems to be borne out by recent media articles).  The Panel also stressed that “It is essential that a person giving expert evidence does so on an independent basis, and not affected by the position of the submitter calling that witness.”  Put simply, the Council planners are experts and if their expert view is that more higher-density areas are required then that is their view regardless of what councillors might want them to say.
 
It is difficult to see how the Council expert witnesses will not be quizzed about whether  the level of zoning in the PAUP is sufficient, or if any upzoning is required.  As experts, these witnesses have an obligation to provide independent expert evidence to the Panel – the Council’s view is therefore of little relevance.
 
In reaching its decision, the Panel has a wide ambit.  It can hear out of scope submissions, and it can make out of scope recommendations to Council.  As such, the Panel could come back recommending Council upzone various areas from the PAUP.  If the Panel does recommend out of scope changes, and they’re accepted by Council, then anyone “unduly prejudiced” can appeal to the Environment Court.
 
Ultimately, the Panel has to make the decision that will achieve the best resource management outcome on the evidence before it (including all the evidence in favour of upzoning), so the Council’s stance, whether it is for or against the upzoning, may not be as important in the wider process as the papers suggest.  We will see.


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From the Centre of the Earth to the Heavens

Silver City Minerals’ proposed withdrawal from New Zealand highlights the power of...

From the Centre of the Earth to the Heavens

News & Insights

From the Centre of the Earth to the Heavens

Silver City Minerals’ proposed withdrawal from New Zealand highlights the power of landowners over the minerals lying on and under their land.



The ASX-listed epithermal gold explorer had spent a considerable amount on exploration work at its Bay of Plenty prospect, pursuant to its exploration permit granted under the Crown Minerals Act 1991.  Despite the local landowner, Maori Investments Limited, having granted short term access, negotiations for a longer term deal for mining access fell through earlier this year.  As a result, Silver City has had to abandon its project and withdraw from New Zealand.

Although details of the negotiation are private, we understand that a commercial participation by way of joint venture and/or royalty stream was on the table.  Perhaps the deal on offer was not good enough, perhaps the landowner had a more fundamental philosophical objection, or perhaps the explorer had breached earlier access terms.  Whatever the reasons, the landowner was exercising its de facto rights of control over the minerals in its land, notwithstanding the Crown Minerals Act’s reservation of ownership in the minerals to the Crown and the grant of exploration rights to Silver City.
Under the Act, the Crown owns all gold, silver and other minerals in land (subject to some specific exemptions), but resource companies acquire no interest in the land and no statutory access rights.  Rather, they have to negotiate access with the landowner.  They cannot force access through any arbitral route (unlike the case for petroleum).

Negotiating land access does not have to be a passive matter.  Provided the right risk allocation and control balance is reached, there is scope for landowners to look at a more innovative deal, beyond the usual scenario of a passive payment for access.  Consider the possibility of some more active participation in the project, say with some equity participation, free carry rights (ie. participation in the project without having to fund your share of costs) or a production based royalty stream.  The options are numerous and can be crafted to suit the circumstances.
Bearing in mind that applicable resource consents and permit conditions will likely require full restoration and rehabilitation, health and safety compliance and impose myriad other conditions, overall the risk side of any such participation can be sagely assessed and managed against the commercial upside.  Of course there are risks around how to manage joint and several liability and day to day compliance, but for the right project some interesting deals around land access are possible.

Given the imperative to gain access, and the landowner’s inalienable ability to say “no”, the bargaining positions may not necessarily be unbalanced, and there is potential for great collaboration here.  Prices for various commodities may be in cyclical decline for now, but a correction will occur sooner or later and those mining companies who can afford to do so generally take a long term view – meaning that a “no” will not necessarily see them quit their permit altogether.


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Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2015

We were pleased to be part of the inaugural Property Council Southern Excellence awards...

Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2015

News & Insights

Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2015

Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2015

We were pleased to be part of the inaugural Property Council Southern Excellence awards which recognise and celebrate the people in property in the South Island. The award winners were announced in a spectacular sold out event in Christchurch on 20 November 2015.


Congratulations to Camilla Gibbons of Aurecon NZ Limited, the winner of the Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year Award.  Camilla’s outstanding performance in property will also be rewarded by a prize provided by the Property Council’s South Island Education Trust which includes complementary attendance at the Property Council’s National Conference in 2016.
 
Partner Lauren Semple, in presenting Camilla with the award, said, “We are delighted to be able to continue our support for the Property Council through this award.  The quality of nominees for the Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year was very high and should stand the South Island property sector in good stead for the future.  Congratulations to Camilla, a very worthy recipient for her contribution to the recovery in Christchurch over the past two years.”


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The Impending Race for Prime Office Space in the Auckland CBD

Auckland-based Barry Walker and Ian Becke say likely changes in conditions in the Auckland...

The Impending Race for Prime Office Space in the Auckland CBD

News & Insights

The Impending Race for Prime Office Space in the Auckland CBD

Auckland-based Barry Walker and Ian Becke say likely changes in conditions in the Auckland office leasing market arising from new developments and key issues for tenants and landlords in a shifting market, drawing from their experiences in the recent Australian leasing cycle.


The Auckland CBD office market is currently experiencing a period of sustained and significant pressure, with vacancy rates across all grades of office space in the Auckland CBD at record low levels.  The pressure is especially acute at the premium end of the market, where the vacancy rate for prime space currently sits below 3%.  Of the prime space that is available, much of it comprises fragmented, part-floor tenancies situated on lower levels. 

The increasingly constrained market conditions mean that landlords are in the box seat when it comes to the leasing of available space.  Rents are on the rise, market rent reviews are invariably hard ratcheted and incentives are nominal or non-existent.  The lack of viable alternative premises and the costs associated with relocation dictate that the predominant focus of most tenant leasing strategies is retention and consolidation of existing premises.

As a substantial supply of new prime office space begins to come online, market conditions and the landlord-tenant dynamic will progressively be characterised by oversupply rather than by constrained supply and high demand. 

We look at what these expected changes mean for landlords and tenants.


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Wellington ICT Graduate School

New Wellington ICT Graduate School to set a new standard for advanced education...

News & Insights

Wellington ICT Graduate School

New Wellington ICT Graduate School to set a new standard for advanced education


A joint venture between Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington Institute of Technology and Whitireia Polytechnic has won the Government mandate to establish and operate the new Wellington ICT Graduate School.
 
The Wellington region’s ICT industry has been identified as critical to the “weightless economy”, with notable concentrations in creative and digital, film and gaming firms, state sector ICT employment and ICT consulting firms.  The ICT industry is fast‑paced and rapidly growing, demanding innovative approaches to education and training.
 
Through a range of different ICT programmes offered collaboratively by the three institutions, the ICT Graduate School will provide a pipeline of new graduates with the more practically‑focussed skills and attributes demanded by industry. 
 
The Graduate School will work closely with industry partners, who will be able to provide student scholarships, teaching and guest lecturers, internships and mentoring.
 
From new premises in Wigan Street, Te Aro, the ICT Graduate School will be closely connected with the Wellington Tech Hub, in which the Wellington tech community connects and collaborates to generate new and exciting ideas.
 
Partner Brigid McArthur and Principal Doran Wyatt have been working with Victoria, the lead institution, on the corporate structuring for the collaboration, joint venture documentation and on the redevelopment and leasing agreements for the new ICT Graduate School premises.  We are delighted to be working at the heart of a project that recognises the vibrancy of Wellington’s ICT and start‑up culture.
 


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New Health and Safety Legislation Passes

Parliament recently passed the Health and Safety at Work Bill and this new law will take...

New Health and Safety Legislation Passes

News & Insights

New Health and Safety Legislation Passes

New Health and Safety Legislation Passes

Parliament recently passed the Health and Safety at Work Bill and this new law will take effect on 4 April 2016. To prepare, we recommend that every person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) should:


  1. Understand its duties: Every PCBU has a primary duty to workers involved in its business and to other people whose health and safety might be put at risk from work carried out as part of its business. A PCBU that manages or controls a workplace has an additional duty relating to the workplace and the workplace’s entry and exit ways. There are also additional duties for any PCBU that designs, manufactures, imports, supplies or installs plant, substances or structures, or that manages or controls fixtures, fittings or plant.  Both “plant” and “structure” are very broadly defined to capture all or any part of equipment, vehicles, appliances, tools, buildings and pipelines. These duties require a PCBU to act to the standard of what is “reasonably practicable”. This is a high standard but it does not require a PCBU to do absolutely everything that is technically possible. Where a PCBU does not have particular expertise, it is entitled to rely on experts’ advice.
  2. Consult and coordinate with the holders of shared duties: Where two or more PCBUs have a duty in relation to the same matter, they are required to consult, cooperate and coordinate their activities. This obligation might, for example, be triggered by a landlord/tenant relationship, a construction project or within a contractual supply chain. We recommend that a PCBU keep its own records, or record in its contracts, the fact that consultation has occurred and the agreed outcomes of cooperation and coordination.
  3. Identify health and safety risks and take steps to prevent them causing harm: The definition of “reasonably practicable” requires a PCBU to identify and assess its hazards and risks, and the ways to eliminate or minimise them. We recommend that a PCBU establish a regular process to assess its risks and determine their associated controls.
  4. Ensure that its officers will meet their due diligence obligations: Every officer has a positive obligation, with associated personal liability, to exercise due diligence to ensure that the relevant PCBU complies with its duties and obligations. The definition of “officer” captures any director of a company, any partner in a partnership, any general partner in a limited partnership, and certain senior managers who are able to exercise significant influence over the management of a business or undertaking. We recommend that a PCBU establish a programme to ensure that its officers will take reasonable steps to fulfil the six defined actions listed in the new law, which together will satisfy the due diligence requirement.
  5. Understand its worker engagement, participation and representation obligations: Following late amendments to the new law, a PCBU must only allow an elected health and safety representative and decide whether to establish a health and safety committee if it has 20 or more workers or it operates within certain defined high risk industries. The proposed list of high risk industries has been controversial, excluding for example sheep, beef, dairy and deer farming, but including horse, pig, rabbit and worm farming. However, the new law still requires every PCBU to allow for worker engagement and participation in relation to health and safety in defined ways.
  6. Understand its record keeping and notification obligations: A PCBU must notify WorkSafe New Zealand, and keep its own records, of any notifiable event, including any death and certain defined serious illnesses and incidents.
  7. Understand which health and safety regulations apply to it: PCBUs working in particular sectors will likely be aware that a number of industry-specific regulations are being reformed. However, PCBUs may not be aware that the new Health and Safety at Work (General Risk and Workplace Management) Regulations will include a number of additional general duties relating to emergency plans, workplace facilities, first aid, personal protective equipment, health monitoring and young people in the workplace. Those Health and Safety at Work (General Risk and Workplace Management) Regulations will also require a PCBU to follow defined processes to manage particular risks such as remote work, hazardous atmospheres, hazardous containers, falling objects and loose materials.

Many New Zealand PCBUs will need to make changes to comply with the new law, but the April 2016 commencement date means that there is time left to achieve this.  Please do involve us if you need help in applying the new rules. You should also keep an eye on updates from WorkSafe New Zealand: see http://www.business.govt.nz/worksafe/


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Brigid McArthur – Partner

Brigid is a highly regarded senior corporate/commercial lawyer specialising in energy and...

Brigid McArthur

Lauren Semple – Partner

Lauren practises in all areas of resource management law, specialising in large-scale urban...

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Anthony’s specialist expertise is in commercial and banking and finance – retail...

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Rachel has over 20 years’ experience acting for companies, government, State-owned enterprises...

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Sean re-joined Greenwood Roche in April 2015 after working as a Judges’ clerk at the...

Sean Conway

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Kurt joined Greenwood Roche in March 2014 after completing his law degree at the University...

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Laura Shields – Lawyer

Laura joined Greenwood Roche in 2014 from the Ministry for Primary Industries where she advised...

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Jimmy joined Greenwood Roche in 2014. He undertakes a range of general commercial and commercial...

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