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About

 

About Greenwood Roche

Two pivotal areas define the way we’ve shaped our firm to deliver more to our clients:
  • Clearly defined specialist areas, each with a significant depth of focused, legal expertise.
  • The acknowledgement of a trusted place at a client’s table, where we deliver the high levels of care, rigour and performance our clients expect of themselves.

We don’t stand apart. When briefed by a client we become an embedded part of the team. We engage our depth of knowledge and commercial acumen to swiftly identify what’s required from the outset – and set about delivering it. It’s not a revelatory approach, but it is refreshing, competitive and deeply efficient – and enjoyable.

It has earned us a market reputation as a leader in our areas of expertise where we have established:
  • A prominent position on the “All of Government” external legal services panel.

  • A substantial public and private sector client base.

  • Regular appointments to nationally significant projects.

They operate with a level of charisma in the room – certainly not order takers. They sense the gaps then find the solutions.”
National coverage

To ensure our specialists are always where they’re needed, we operate as one firm with hubs in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. We advise on a range of public and private sector projects.


Specialist expertise

Recent projects
Acquisition of Maari Interests by Horizon Oil

Recent Projects

Acquisition of Maari Interests by Horizon Oil

Acquisition of Maari Interests by Horizon Oil

Brigid McArthur and Rachel Murdoch acted for Horizon Oil International Limited on its acquisition of an additional 16% interest in the Maari petroleum permit and associated joint venture assets.


Horizon Oil, already the holder of a 10% participating interest in the producing Maari/Manaia fields, has acquired an additional 16% interest from Todd Energy as a result of Todd’s rationalisation of its Taranaki oil and gas assets.  OMV (operator) and Cue Taranaki hold the balance.
 
Brigid and Rachel advised on the requisite Overseas Investment Office sensitive land application and the application for Ministerial consent under the Crown Minerals Act, and assisted Horizon Oil’s General Counsel with certain other closing matters.  Following the obtaining of these regulatory consents, closing was successfully completed on 31 May 2018. 
 
The Maari and Manaia fields have offered stable oil production since 2009 and stable employment opportunities for over 100 people.  As at November 2017, gross field production stood at 8,840bpd of oil.  Gross projected 2P reserves were at 21 mmbls and 2C reserves of oil at 69 mmbls, as at 30 June 2017.  Since 2017 the joint venture has been undertaking field optimisation work as part of the Maari Production Improvement Program.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Recent Projects

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Greenwood Roche has assisted Mighty River Power with the procurement and negotiation of contracts for its plant refurbishment project at Aratiatia


Austria-based Andritz was awarded the contract to provide work on three generating units at the 78-MW Aratiatia hydroelectric station.

The Greenwood Roche team for this project comprised partner Barry Walker and special counsel Adrian Doherty.  Barry and Adrian are experienced international construction project lawyers, comfortable using a variety of international standard documents, including FIDIC, to assist in smooth cross-border negotiations.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
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Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
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Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
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Purchase of Alinta Energy

Recent Projects

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Brigid McArthur, Monique Thomas and Sam Green acted earlier this year, alongside an Allen & Overy team, on New Zealand aspects of the purchase by Hong Kong-based Chow Tai Fook Enterprises of Australia’s largest electricity and gas utility, Alinta Energy.


The sale follows an about-face on Alinta’s delayed public float, which itself followed an earlier inconclusive sale process.  The deal remains subject to foreign investment approval in Australia.

In New Zealand, the Alinta assets include the Glenbrook Steel Mill cogeneration plant.

Chow Tai Fook is a privately-owned holding company with existing investments across 50 countries, straddling hotels, retail, property and jewellery businesses.

- Photo courtesy of Alinta Energy


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
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Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Recent Projects

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Australasian utility contractor Electrix, part of McConnell Dowell, has been acquired by French construction giant VINCI Energies. Electrix has approximately 2,000 employees located in New Zealand and Australia and provides a range of maintenance and construction services for utility providers.


Greenwood Roche assisted VINCI in respect of New Zealand aspects of the transaction, working closely with VINCI Energies’ international legal teams from Baker McKenzie (Sydney) and Bolze Associés (Paris).  Greenwood Roche is proud to have worked with VINCI and its legal team on this project.

About VINCI:
 

  • VINCI Energies' is the world’s largest company in construction and related services and is listed on Euronext's Paris stock exchange and is a member of the CAC 40 index.
  • According to its website, in 2013 the VINCI Group had 171,678 employees and worked on 266,000 projects in 100 countries – with VINCI Energies having around 63,000 employees in 45 countries.
  • For more information on VINCI Energies, please visit www.vinci.com


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
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Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Recent Projects

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

New Zealanders are well aware of the severe challenges Bathurst Resources has overcome in progressing its West Coast coal mining project.


Greenwood Roche has been part of the Bathurst team on some important parts of the Buller Project, advising on land acquisition and land rights for the coal handling and preparation facility and the proposed aerial conveyor, and obtaining requisite Overseas Investment Office approvals.
 
We have also been acting jointly for Bathurst Resources and Westport Harbour on their joint arrangements for the siting, construction and operation of a coal handling facility at Westport Port.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
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Download as a PDF
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Tiwai Point Electricity

Recent Projects

Tiwai Point Electricity

Tiwai Point Electricity

New Zealand's Aluminium Smelter at Tiwai Point produces the world’s highest purity primary aluminium, contributing more than $600 million annually in export income for New Zealand.


Tiwai Point is New Zealand's largest single user of electricity by a very large margin and is an integral part of the electricity market and system – employing 800 people directly with a flow-on employment profile of over three thousand jobs.

Greenwood Roche advises New Zealand's Aluminium Smelter and Pacific Aluminium on all aspects of the Tiwai Point Aluminium Smelter electricity supply, including the 2013 and 2015 renegotiations with Meridian Energy.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Download as a PDF
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Arise Centre

Recent Projects

Arise Centre

Arise Centre

Greenwood Roche assisted Arise with its flagship church project in Petone.


Greenwood Roche acted for Arise on the construction of its distinctive new build church, the Arise Centre, in Petone, Wellington. 
 
The Arise Centre has now received an NZIA Local Architecture Award, recognising the Centre as being amongst the best new architecture in Wellington.  The “new take” on church architecture enables the congregation to be brought together in a large space where it can make some noise.  Located in a relatively sparse former industrial space, the building comes into its own at night, imbued with a golden light.
 
The Greenwood Roche team for the project included partner Doran Wyatt and principal James Riddoch.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Recent Projects

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Australasian utility contractor Electrix, part of McConnell Dowell, has been acquired by French construction giant VINCI Energies. Electrix has approximately 2,000 employees located in New Zealand and Australia and provides a range of maintenance and construction services for utility providers.


Greenwood Roche assisted VINCI in respect of New Zealand aspects of the transaction, working closely with VINCI Energies’ international legal teams from Baker McKenzie (Sydney) and Bolze Associés (Paris).  Greenwood Roche is proud to have worked with VINCI and its legal team on this project.

About VINCI:
 

  • VINCI Energies' is the world’s largest company in construction and related services and is listed on Euronext's Paris stock exchange and is a member of the CAC 40 index.
  • According to its website, in 2013 the VINCI Group had 171,678 employees and worked on 266,000 projects in 100 countries – with VINCI Energies having around 63,000 employees in 45 countries.
  • For more information on VINCI Energies, please visit www.vinci.com


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Tiwai Point Fourth Potline Restart

Recent Projects

Tiwai Point Fourth Potline Restart

Tiwai Point Fourth Potline Restart

Brigid McArthur has acted this year for New Zealand Aluminium Smelters  and parent Pacific Aluminium on the electricity hedge contract and associated arrangements with NZX and Sumitomo, for the restart of potline 4 at the Tiwai Point Smelter.


On 1 May 2018 New Zealand Aluminium Smelters announced plans to restart the fourth potline at its Tiwai Point Smelter, that has been sitting idle in a low price aluminium market since 2012.
 
Greenwood Roche partner Brigid McArthur acted for NZAS on its contract with Meridian Energy for an additional 50 MW electricity hedge to enable the restart, underwriting NZAS’ spot price risk on the extra volume out to 2022.  The new contract effectively sits on top of the existing 572 MW contract for Tiwai, lasting until 2030.
 
Meridian itself supported the Tiwai arrangement with its own separate contracts with Contact Energy, Genesis Energy and Mercury.
 
The fourth potline restart is a further boon to the Southland economy, with an additional 32 skilled jobs and a further 85 tonnes of aluminium produced per day, and this from a smelter with one of the lowest carbon footprints globally.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Purchase of Alinta Energy

Recent Projects

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Brigid McArthur, Monique Thomas and Sam Green acted earlier this year, alongside an Allen & Overy team, on New Zealand aspects of the purchase by Hong Kong-based Chow Tai Fook Enterprises of Australia’s largest electricity and gas utility, Alinta Energy.


The sale follows an about-face on Alinta’s delayed public float, which itself followed an earlier inconclusive sale process.  The deal remains subject to foreign investment approval in Australia.

In New Zealand, the Alinta assets include the Glenbrook Steel Mill cogeneration plant.

Chow Tai Fook is a privately-owned holding company with existing investments across 50 countries, straddling hotels, retail, property and jewellery businesses.

- Photo courtesy of Alinta Energy


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Recent Projects

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Australasian utility contractor Electrix, part of McConnell Dowell, has been acquired by French construction giant VINCI Energies. Electrix has approximately 2,000 employees located in New Zealand and Australia and provides a range of maintenance and construction services for utility providers.


Greenwood Roche assisted VINCI in respect of New Zealand aspects of the transaction, working closely with VINCI Energies’ international legal teams from Baker McKenzie (Sydney) and Bolze Associés (Paris).  Greenwood Roche is proud to have worked with VINCI and its legal team on this project.

About VINCI:
 

  • VINCI Energies' is the world’s largest company in construction and related services and is listed on Euronext's Paris stock exchange and is a member of the CAC 40 index.
  • According to its website, in 2013 the VINCI Group had 171,678 employees and worked on 266,000 projects in 100 countries – with VINCI Energies having around 63,000 employees in 45 countries.
  • For more information on VINCI Energies, please visit www.vinci.com


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Recent Projects

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

New Zealanders are well aware of the severe challenges Bathurst Resources has overcome in progressing its West Coast coal mining project.


Greenwood Roche has been part of the Bathurst team on some important parts of the Buller Project, advising on land acquisition and land rights for the coal handling and preparation facility and the proposed aerial conveyor, and obtaining requisite Overseas Investment Office approvals.
 
We have also been acting jointly for Bathurst Resources and Westport Harbour on their joint arrangements for the siting, construction and operation of a coal handling facility at Westport Port.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Recent Projects

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Greenwood Roche has assisted Mighty River Power with the procurement and negotiation of contracts for its plant refurbishment project at Aratiatia


Austria-based Andritz was awarded the contract to provide work on three generating units at the 78-MW Aratiatia hydroelectric station.

The Greenwood Roche team for this project comprised partner Barry Walker and special counsel Adrian Doherty.  Barry and Adrian are experienced international construction project lawyers, comfortable using a variety of international standard documents, including FIDIC, to assist in smooth cross-border negotiations.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Purchase of Alinta Energy

Recent Projects

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Purchase of Alinta Energy

Brigid McArthur, Monique Thomas and Sam Green acted earlier this year, alongside an Allen & Overy team, on New Zealand aspects of the purchase by Hong Kong-based Chow Tai Fook Enterprises of Australia’s largest electricity and gas utility, Alinta Energy.


The sale follows an about-face on Alinta’s delayed public float, which itself followed an earlier inconclusive sale process.  The deal remains subject to foreign investment approval in Australia.

In New Zealand, the Alinta assets include the Glenbrook Steel Mill cogeneration plant.

Chow Tai Fook is a privately-owned holding company with existing investments across 50 countries, straddling hotels, retail, property and jewellery businesses.

- Photo courtesy of Alinta Energy


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

Recent Projects


Bid to Purchase Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi Oil and Gas Assets

UK listed oil and gas explorer Mosman Oil & Gas was successful in striking a deal with Origin Energy to purchase the Taranaki Rimu, Kauri and Manutahi (RKM) petroleum fields and associated petroleum production infrastructure.


Alas, with oil prices falling below US$40 per barrel for a sustained period, Mosman and its joint venture partners were forced to cancel the sale and purchase agreement.  Reportedly, the assets may still be available for purchase.
Partner Brigid McArthur and solicitors Susan Baas and Kurt McRedmond worked with Mosman on its acquisition project, including on its due diligence, sale and purchase negotiations and applications for New Zealand Petroleum & Minerals and Overseas Investment Office consents.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Recent Projects


Establishment of CarboNZero Certified Ecotricity Limited Partnership

Ecotricity is New Zealand’s only “carboNZero” certified, 100% renewable electricity retailer. This means that it sources electricity only from sustainable and renewable sources, such as hydro and wind.



Partner Brigid McArthur recently acted for Ecotricity Limited on the establishment of the joint venture, by way of limited partnership, with Pioneer Generation Limited.  Pioneer owns and operates some significant renewable generation projects in the South Island.  The Ecotricity Limited Partnership is also investing in electric vehicles and associated infrastructure.
Together, Ecotricity and Pioneer are championing the case for investment in renewables and we congratulate them on their venture.  They are at the forefront of what is a growing trend away from conventional fossil fuel based technologies.  Your support can be enhanced by visiting the Ecotricity website and checking the deals on offer.  www.ecotricity.co.nz


Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Recent Projects

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Greenwood Roche assists French construction giant

Australasian utility contractor Electrix, part of McConnell Dowell, has been acquired by French construction giant VINCI Energies. Electrix has approximately 2,000 employees located in New Zealand and Australia and provides a range of maintenance and construction services for utility providers.


Greenwood Roche assisted VINCI in respect of New Zealand aspects of the transaction, working closely with VINCI Energies’ international legal teams from Baker McKenzie (Sydney) and Bolze Associés (Paris).  Greenwood Roche is proud to have worked with VINCI and its legal team on this project.

About VINCI:
 

  • VINCI Energies' is the world’s largest company in construction and related services and is listed on Euronext's Paris stock exchange and is a member of the CAC 40 index.
  • According to its website, in 2013 the VINCI Group had 171,678 employees and worked on 266,000 projects in 100 countries – with VINCI Energies having around 63,000 employees in 45 countries.
  • For more information on VINCI Energies, please visit www.vinci.com


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Recent Projects

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

Bathurst Resources – Buller Coal Project

New Zealanders are well aware of the severe challenges Bathurst Resources has overcome in progressing its West Coast coal mining project.


Greenwood Roche has been part of the Bathurst team on some important parts of the Buller Project, advising on land acquisition and land rights for the coal handling and preparation facility and the proposed aerial conveyor, and obtaining requisite Overseas Investment Office approvals.
 
We have also been acting jointly for Bathurst Resources and Westport Harbour on their joint arrangements for the siting, construction and operation of a coal handling facility at Westport Port.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x

Download as a PDF
Close window
x
Northern Interceptor and North Harbour No. 2 Pipeline Projects

Recent Projects


Northern Interceptor and North Harbour No. 2 Pipeline Projects

Greenwood Roche is assisting Watercare with these two strategic pipeline projects designed to enable Watercare to keep up with the proposed growth in the northwest of Auckland.


These two projects are estimated to cost Watercare $800 million. The Northern Interceptor wastewater project will be constructed in various stages with construction to begin soon on stage one to service the growth areas in Massey North, Whenuapai, Hobsonville, Kumeu, Huapai and Riverhead. The North Harbour No.2 watermain will service the new Albany reservoir and will replace the existing watermain which cannot be maintained without disrupting local water supplies.

Hadleigh Yonge is leading Greenwood Roche’s team which is advising Watercare on all aspects of these projects, including providing strategic advice, negotiating and acquiring property rights, and advising and dealing with issues relating to compensation.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Similar projects
Watercare’s North Shore Trunk Sewer 8

Recent Projects


Watercare’s North Shore Trunk Sewer 8

Watercare Services Limited is responsible for providing water and wastewater services to the greater Auckland region and is undertaking a number of projects to increase its infrastructure network.


Greenwood Roche is advising Watercare on the construction of a significant new wastewater pipeline in the Northcote area. The project affects a number of properties including private and various forms of public land.  Our work has included the acquisition of property rights to enter and construct the works, and issues relating to compensation.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

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Waipa Networks’ new transmission line

Recent Projects


Waipa Networks’ new transmission line

Waipa Networks has identified the need to construct a new 110kV transmission line to increase the security and reliability of electricity supply to Te Awamutu and the surrounding areas.


We are advising Waipa Networks on this project. Our work has included strategic advice, acquisition of land property rights, Maori land issues, and advice on compulsory acquisition rights and compensation entitlements.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
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Download as a PDF
Close window
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Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Recent Projects

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Aratiatia hydroelectric plant refurbishment

Greenwood Roche has assisted Mighty River Power with the procurement and negotiation of contracts for its plant refurbishment project at Aratiatia


Austria-based Andritz was awarded the contract to provide work on three generating units at the 78-MW Aratiatia hydroelectric station.

The Greenwood Roche team for this project comprised partner Barry Walker and special counsel Adrian Doherty.  Barry and Adrian are experienced international construction project lawyers, comfortable using a variety of international standard documents, including FIDIC, to assist in smooth cross-border negotiations.


Specialist expertise

Key lawyers involved

Download as a PDF
Close window
x

Recent news & insights
Duffy Books

News & Insights

Duffy Books

Duffy Books

We are excited this year to be continuing our support of the Duffy Books in Homes Programme.  Since its launch in 1995, Duffy Books has been “inspiring a love of reading in children, so they can become adults who inspire a love of reading.”  By supporting a low decile school operating on an ever-tight budget, the Programme ensures an increasing number of children have the opportunity and resources to read.


Greenwood Roche is proud to be supporting Riverhills School (Auckland), St Anne’s School (Wellington) and Bamford School (Christchurch).  Our team has enjoyed working together to support the programme, particularly the cake baking competitions! Representatives from each of our offices have attended school assemblies to deliver books to students and have been humbled by the warm welcome we have received.  Books are important to lawyers and its great to see the next generation of readers getting the chance to shine. 

We are looking forward to watching the progress of the children on their path to a lifelong love of reading.  To find out more about the Programme and the difference it is making, or to make a donation, you can visit Duffy Books at http://www.booksinhomes.org.nz.

Photo:  Young pupils of St Anne’s School in Newtown, Wellington


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Draft Set of National Planning Standard Released for Consultation

News & Insights

Draft Set of National Planning Standard Released for Consultation

The first draft set of National Planning Standards have been released for consultation under the Resource Management Act 1991. Designed to reduce unnecessary variation across regional policy statements and regional and district plans, the proposed standards direct a templated structure, form and some content across these documents. Once these final standards have been notified, councils will have between 5 – 7 years to amend their planning documents accordingly. While we do not anticipate that compliance with the proposed structure and form standards will be overly challenging (particularly for the bigger councils such as Auckland and Christchurch), standardisation of the definitions is more controversial. 


Background

The mechanism for allowing central government to design and implement standards which could be applied nationally or for specific localities or regions was introduced in 2017 among a suite of other changes to the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). 

The change sought to recognise that while the RMA is necessarily a devolved system in which councils have the ability to tailor their individual regional and district plans and policy statements, the large amount of variation that has consequently occurred has made these documents harder to prepare and use (impacting on efficiency) and has detracted from councils’ ability to invest more time and resource into addressing truly local planning matters.  Some basic standardisation of these documents led by central government is considered to assist in addressing these issues, in addition to creating better alignment and information sharing between councils, and increasing navigability of these documents for professionals and plan users. 

To qualify for standardisation, the Minister for the Environment (or Minister for Conservation if the matter relates to the coastal marine area) must consider that the matter in question:
 

  • requires national consistency;
  • is required to support the implementation of a national environmental standard, a national policy statement, a New Zealand coastal policy statement or regulations made under the RMA;
  • is required to assist people to comply with the new procedural principles set out in section 18A of the RMA.
There are a range of matters to which the Minister may have regard when developing a national planning standard, and a range of higher order documents to which those standards must either give effect to or be consistent with. 

For mandatory directions, councils are not required to use the normal Schedule 1 process to amend their plans to align with these standards, avoiding any added cost and delay associated with the standard consultative process of plan changes.  For discretionary directions (where councils have options over which provisions they implement), one of the Schedule 1 processes must be used.  Further, while the RMA stipulates that councils have a year to implement mandatory directives, it also authorises the Minister to amend that timeframe in the direction.

Conceptually, these standards make perfect sense.  However as usual, the devil is in both the detail of the standards and implementation requirements, which brings us to the first draft set of national planning standards which have been notified for consultation. 

Round 1: the first set of planning standards

The first set has been produced in accordance with a specific direction in the RMA, which required them to include a structure and form for policy statements, definitions, and requirements for the electronic functionality and accessibility of policy statements and plans.  In summary:
 
  • The structure standards set a common framework for plan provisions that all plans must use.  The structure is made up of parts, then chapters then sections.  Some chapters are required in all plans, while others are only required if they are relevant to a district or region.  Most notably, a set of 27 zones (divided into ‘zone families’) will be standardised, and will include a purpose statement for each of the zones which guides what it does and their colour(!).  Councils may still create special purpose zones but only in specific circumstances where they do not overlap with the purposes of other zones.  Because Councils have discretion over which zones they will include, a Schedule 1 RMA process must be used to make these changes.
  • The form standards are principally concerned with:
    • improving the electronic accessibility and functioning of plans across New Zealand;
    • standardising mapping formats (colours and symbols) and the use of specific spatial planning tools such as zones, overlays, notations, precincts and structure plans; and
    • combining objectives and policies with rules which are to be included in a table format.
  • Discussed in further detail below, the content standards require the adoption of 109 terms and their definitions, and the use of specific noise and vibration metric standards.  Nearly half these terms use the definitions given in the RMA, NZ Standards and other Acts. 
While the default RMA timeframe for implementing planning standards is one year, in response to feedback from Councils, the Minister has decided to extend the implementation timeframes for these standards to seven years for councils that have recently adopted their second generation plans, and five years for others. 

Interestingly, the decision to extend the timeframes was made in preference to the request from Councils that implementation simply be required when Councils undertake the next review of their plans.  For reasons we discuss in further detail below, some of these standards will require potentially significant re-drafting of the existing plans and policy statements which arguably could be more effectively achieved as part of a wider review. 

Discussion

While many of the proposed standards will be (to varying degrees) administratively burdensome for councils (and certainly teething issues can be expected), reducing variation in structure and form in the manner proposed should largely avoid any impacts on the substance of the planning documents.  However, two areas which are bound to cause more headaches for councils are the inclusion of standard zones and new definitions (being those not already defined in the RMA, NZ Standards or other legislation). 

As set out above, councils have discretion to choose at least one of the 27 zones for inclusion in their plans.  The prescribed zones are accompanied by broadly drafted purpose statements (which the zone provisions must fulfill), but the drafting of the objectives, policies and rules for the zone remains with councils.  While it is not clear from the drafting, it would seem that councils cannot comply with this directive by simply including one of the 27 zones.  The discretion to not include a prescribed zone may be exercised only where the prescribed zone is not relevant for the council in question (i.e. they have no port for which a zone could be used).  Further, councils can only add special purpose zones where proposed land use activities and anticipated development within a defined area are:
 
  • significant to the district or region;
  • could not be enabled by another zone; and
  • could not be enabled by the introduction of an overlay, precinct, designation, development area, or specific control.  
In summary, the onus appears to be on councils to demonstrate that any inconsistency between its zones and the prescribed zones are because the prescribed zones or the use of the spatial planning tools are somehow inadequate.

We anticipate that existing zones in most plans would be largely consistent with the prescribed zones, meaning that implementation is unlikely to cause significant issues.  However, the Auckland Unitary Plan is possibly the most notable exception to this, given the plethora of particularly residential zones which were designed to account for the significant growth and associated housing pressures being experienced. 

While some of these zones may fit within the prescribed residential zones, others (for example the Mixed Housing Urban Zone or Mixed Housing Surburban Zone) would more appropriately be identified as a sub-zone rather than a precinct or an overlay (which Auckland Council would need to use if it wanted to differentiate between similar density zones but for different areas).  Given the resource that has gone into the creation of the current zones, simply removing them or subsuming even some of them into the same prescribed zone may be extremely unpalatable.  While overlays and precincts could assist in distinguishing these zones, using these tools to affect what is really a zoning matter seems akin to trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. 
In summary, even with the seven year implementation time frames for some councils, we are expecting to see some push back on this standard.  One solution may be amending the timeframes for implementation of the prescribed zones to the point when the relevant Council is undertaking its next full review.

The prescribed definitions are another area likely to cause some challenges for councils.  While some of the definitions are uncontroversial, others may have significant impact on the broader operation of the relevant plans which may in turn require more widespread amendment.  Because the inclusion of the definitions is a mandatory directive, councils do not have to use the Schedule 1 process.  However, consequential amendments to the plan beyond the scope of section 58I(3)(d) do require the full Schedule 1 process. (Section 58I(3)(d) refers only to consequential amendments needed to avoid duplication or inconsistency).

Plan for example, will require consequential amendments to many other rules simply in order to make those rules coherent.  The current definition of “building” in the Christchurch District Plan includes “any erection, reconstruction, placement, alteration or demolition of any structure or part of any structure within, on, under or over the land”.  In that sense, the definition effectively operates as a rule in itself.  The prescribed definition of “building” in the standards however is: “any structure, whether temporary or permanent, moveable or fixed, that is enclosed with 2 or more walls and a roof or any structure that is similarly enclosed”.  Consequently, if the prescribed definition is included in the Christchurch District Plan, any activity description for “building” must also be amended (possibly using the Schedule 1 process) to include the action of erection, reconstruction, placement, alteration or demolition of any structure. 

There are a number of other examples of prescribed definitions which will not only impact on the operation of the wider plan, but which may also inadvertently exclude activities which have relied on existing definitions to establish in certain areas.  The prescribed definition of “community facility” for example requires the facility to be “non-profit”, a somewhat arbitrary characteristic which does not feature as an exclusive requirement in the Auckland Unitary Plan definition or the Christchurch District Plan definition. 

Similarly with the zoning, it would seem to us to make a great deal more sense to require councils to include these definitions when they next undertake a review of their district plan, rather than requiring them (even within seven years) to override the existing provisions (and consequently the significant resource expended to develop them) and replace them with new provisions which have been developed without reference to each particular setting in which they will operate.  Again we expect to see feedback to that effect when submissions are published.

From here

The Ministry for the Environment is now accepting submissions on the draft planning standards which are available for your review here http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/rma/draft-national-planning-standards.  Submissions close on Friday 17 August 2018.  The indicative timeframes suggest that the finalised version of these will be gazetted in April next year. 

Greenwood Roche is following the development of these planning standards closely and our resource management team is more than happy to answer any questions you may have or assist you if you would like to draft a submission.
 


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Recent High Court decision is salutary reminder of a builder’s duty of care to building owners

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Recent High Court decision is salutary reminder of a builder’s duty of care to building owners

Recent High Court decision is salutary reminder of a builder’s duty of care to building owners

In the case Minister of Education v H Construction North Island Limited (formerly Hawkins Construction North Island Limited), compelling evidence of buckets collecting rainwater in classrooms at Botany Downs Secondary College set the scene for a significant judgment.  


In the case Minister of Education v H Construction North Island Limited (formerly Hawkins Construction North Island Limited), compelling evidence of buckets collecting rainwater in classrooms at Botany Downs Secondary College set the scene for a significant judgment.  The Minister alleged that nine buildings leaked due to a raft of construction defects for which the builder was liable.  While Hawkins accepted that there were issues with the buildings related to poor workmanship, it contended that the law has not recognised a duty of care in this context and claimed that the building contract precluded any liability in negligence.
 
The Court found Hawkins liable to pay the cost of remedying over half of the alleged defects, at a total cost of $13.4 million.  The decision confirms a clear trend in recent cases that the scope of a builder’s duty of care to building owners is to comply with Building Code standards.  Importantly, it confirms that a contractual relationship between well-informed and well-advised parties is unlikely to exclude the builder’s tortious duty of care unless the contract expressly says so.
 
Central to Hawkins’ defence was that, under the terms of the contract, the architect assumed either the exclusive or primary obligation to comply with the Building Code, and that it would be wrong to interfere with the agreed allocation of risk and commercial certainty.  This argument was unsuccessful, in part because of the notable absence of the architect as a party to the proceedings, but ultimately due to the absence of any express contractual exclusion of Hawkins’ tortious liability.
 
Contractors and claimants should note the following comments on establishing a breach of the Building Code:

  • Moisture meter readings should be approached with caution when used for substantiating a breach.  A lack of evidence of moisture damage or a low moisture meter reading will not necessarily be treated as conclusive.
  • Proof of widespread “actual damage” is not required to establish a breach.  The intention of the Building Code is to prevent damage, and therefore a breach can include “potential damage”.
  • A complete lack of damage after an extended period will likely be fatal to a claim.  The Court found that, on the basis that the school buildings were now 15 years old, any real risk of damage should have become apparent.  Accordingly, a lack of evidence of damage was treated as conclusive.
Another salient point for contractors is the importance of keeping an accurate record of key decisions in the construction process, particularly where the decision is made as a result of a direction from another contractor or consultant.  While Hawkins accepted that some of the defects existed due to a construction failure, it argued that Hawkins had been overruled by the architect as to how some items should be installed.  The Court rejected this argument in the absence of any documentary evidence of the architect’s alleged directions.
 
We regularly advise on construction contracts and related matters.  If you would like to discuss your construction project or this article, please contact Doran Wyatt, Barry Walker or James Riddoch.


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Born Again? Legislative Assistance to Reinstate Christchurch Cathedral

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Born Again? Legislative Assistance to Reinstate Christchurch Cathedral

Since being severely damaged in the 2010/2011 earthquakes, the iconic Christ Church Cathedral has lain largely in ruins, not only impacting the physical and economic regeneration of the immediate surrounds but for many, symbolising the pace (or lack thereof) at which the rebuild of Christchurch has occurred.  Seven years on, announcement after announcement, and significant time and money invested in legal costs and consultancy bills, the decision to re-instate the Cathedral was confirmed by the Anglican diocese in September this year.  The re-instatement option is estimated to cost approximately $104m, and is expected to be funded by grants from the Christchurch City Council, the Great Christchurch Buildings Trust, the Crown and the insurance payout received by the Anglican Church.  In addition to the grant, the Government is offering a $15m loan. 


Recognising the decision of the Diocese, the strategic importance of the Cathedral to the regeneration of the city, and the threat that continued challenge to the reinstatement would present, the Government has proposed legislation which seeks to streamline the process of reinstatement and provide a higher degree of certainty that it will occur.  We have summarised the key elements of the Bill (which was presented to the House in early December) below. 

In brief:

• The Bill will allow the Governor General, on recommendation by the appropriate Minister, to issue Orders in Council (OIC) to grant exemptions from, modify (which includes suspending, or excluding the jurisdiction of the court) or extend statutes listed in Schedule 2 of the Bill.  Perhaps most significantly, the subject statutes currently include the Resource Management Act 1991 (and plans or rules made under it) and the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 (Heritage Act).  In effect, an OIC issued under the Bill could substantially alter or indeed suspend the processes under both of these statutes which if left unaltered could allow for further public, Council or Heritage New Zealand input which might further delay the reinstatement. 

• The Bill also contains a mechanism (utilising OICs on the recommendation of the Minister) to add statutes to Schedule 2.  However, the proposal (via an OIC) to include further statutes in Schedule 2 is made subject to confirmation by the House of Representatives.

• The application of OICs is geographically bound, only applying to the Cathedral area. 

• The supervisory jurisdiction of the High Court through judicial review is proposed to be time bound, requiring applicants to lodge a statement of claim within 28 days of the relevant decision being made.  The justifications for the proposed limit on this crucial constitutional role are the risk and delay to the project, should parties have an open ended right to request review of decisions made under it, and the reduced risk of review given the airtime (both through broader consultation and litigation) already given to affected parties to express their views and concerns.  The limiting of the supervisory jurisdiction of the High Court by the legislature and/or the executive branches has rarely gone down well with the judiciary.  However given the nature of the limit (timing of bringing a claim) and the history of the Cathedral, it may be considered justified on this occasion. 

• Perhaps more interestingly, clause 17(2) of the Bill provides that even where review is requested in good time and the exercise of power is found by the High Court to be invalid, any such determination does not affect the validity or effectiveness of any action already taken under or in reliance on the exercise of power.  Although, the Court retains a discretion to order that that the subsection does not apply this section reinforces to need to act quickly to challenge a decision.  This is both in order to meet the time restriction, but also to mitigate or avoid the risk of what would essentially be a meaningless claim if the action to which the decision relates is already carried out and cannot be “undone”. 

• The recommendation of Minister to the Governor General to issue an OIC in respect of a Schedule 2 statute must satisfy the following pre-requisites before it may be made:

• The Minister must be satisfied that (among other matters) the OIC is necessary or desirable for the purposes of the Act (described below).

  • The terminology “necessary or desirable” seems to be a deliberate deviation from the requirement included in both the (now repealed) Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2010 and the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016 of the Minister to only exercise his/her powers where he/she “reasonably considers it necessary”.  That requirement was subject to a prescriptive judicial interpretation by the Court of Appeal in Independent Fisheries, instituting it as a very high bar for the Minister to meet (1).   Confirmed in that same decision, “desirable” on the other hand sets a much lower bar (2).
  •  A draft of the OIC has been reviewed by a Panel established to review the OICs and the Regulations Review Committee.
  • The Minister has had regard to the Panel’s recommendations on the OIC and the comments of the Committee.
  • The Minister has consulted with the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage (if the OIC relates to the Heritage Act), or the Minister for the Environment (if the OIC relates to the RMA).
  • The statutory engagement process has been followed.
  • In short, this process requires the Minister to “make available” an explanation of the aim of the proposal, the effect it will have, and why the Minister thinks it is “necessary or desirable” to persons the Minister thinks appropriate given the proposed effect of the Order, or to the public generally.  Those persons have 20 working days to provide written comment on the proposal, and the Minister must have regard to those comments. 

• The requirement to exercise statutory authority in accordance with the purposes of the authorising legislation provides a critical “check” on the exercise of power by public bodies. The purposes of the Bill is to facilitate the reinstatement of the Cathedral and, in particular;

  • To facilitate the rein-statement in an expedited manner compared with processes and requirements outside the Act; or
  • To provide cost-effective process for reinstatement compared with processes outside the Act; or
  • To achieve earlier or greater certainty for the owner of the Cathedral and the Christchurch community generally as to the reinstatement of the Cathedral than would be likely under processes and requirements outside the Act.

Interestingly, in order to meet any of those purposes, the proposal (to which the exercise of power relates) must meet both the definition of “re-instatement” and “Cathedral” in clause 4.  Both definitions are broadly drawn.  “Cathedral” includes all ancillary structures and improvements proximate to, and directly associated with, the Cathedral.  “Reinstatement” includes 1 or more of a wide range of other actions, including “demolition of any part of the Cathedral”.  There are, in other words, a plethora of actions as part of reinstatement that this Bill will seek to provide for.  As currently drawn, we do not however consider that, should the decision to reinstate be changed to demolish and replace, the Bill would provide for this. 

General Comment

The discretion afforded to the Minister and the proposed absence of substantive public process will undoubtedly raise concerns as the Bill progresses through the House.  As alluded to, any limitation on the supervisory jurisdiction of the High Court will also attract controversy.  On that basis we would expect to see some amendment to the Bill.  However this is a very specific context and the legislation is designed to address a very specific mischief, being to accelerate the resolution of what has been a very long, expensive and contentious matter.  Further, legislation to facilitate whatever outcome was determined for the Cathedral was also indicated from the former Government, and as such, we could expect general support from both sides of the House. 

Greenwood Roche’s resource management specialists have unrivalled experience with delivering large scale project developments across New Zealand (and particularly in the Canterbury context) using fast track planning legislation.  Our team is following the development of this legislation closely and will provide updates as they come to hand.

Footer:
1. Canterbury Regional Council v Independent Fisheries Limited [2012] NZCA 601.
2. Canterbury Regional Council v Independent Fisheries Limited [2012] NZCA 601, at [107].


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Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2017

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Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2017

Greenwood Roche Young Achiever of the Year 2017

We are pleased to continue to support the Property Council Southern Excellence Awards which recognise and celebrate excellence in property in the South Island.  Christchurch Partner, Lauren Semple had the honour of presenting the Greenwood Roche Young Achiever Award as part of the event on 10 November 2017.


Congratulations to Fiona Short of Warren and Mahoney, this year’s winner of the Greenwood Roche Young Achiever Award.  Fiona is a very deserving winner of this award.  She has recently become an Associate in the Christchurch Warren and Mahoney office, recognising her contribution to the Canterbury Rebuild.  Moving to Christchurch months after the Canterbury Earthquakes, Fiona quickly found her stride working on a wide range of architectural projects.  Her work on the Mary Potter Apartments went on to win a New Zealand Institute of Architects Canterbury Architecture Award. 

Fiona has a clear passion for sustainability, leading the sustainability portfolio group within Warren and Mahoney.  This group has been instrumental in creating documents to redefine what sustainability means to the architecture practice.  Fiona has also played an active role in conversations about diversity and inclusion in the construction industry, including being part of the team responsible for organising the Architecture + Women exhibition aimed at increasing the visibility of the work in the rebuild undertaken by Christchurch women architects.

Congratulations Fiona, we look forward to seeing where your career takes you and to working with you in the future.


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Update: Urban Development Authorities’ Proposal

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Update: Urban Development Authorities’ Proposal

MBIE has released a summary of submissions received on the UDA Proposal released for public comment in February this year.  Greenwood Roche has been following progress of the Proposal which, at least conceptually, has the potential to facilitate the sustainable and innovative growth of our cities.  For more discussion on the Proposal, take a look at our recent article http://www.greenwoodroche.com/news.


Feedback was sought on the overall Proposal, but also on the specific components of the Proposal which was divided into 169 component parts.  In addition to public consultation, MBIE held 45 separate meetings with key stakeholders from both the public and private sectors, and with various Māori groups (including iwi and interest groups). 

350 submissions were lodged during the three month consultation period and, while certain aspects of the proposal were almost unanimously opposed, the Proposal generally received support from over half of the submitters.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, the key aspects opposed including the extent of public consultation; the loss of traditional rights of appeal; the demotion of Part 2 of the RMA; and the transfer of consenting authority to a UDA.  The limited involvement of regional councils was also broadly opposed.  These matters proved less troubling to the development community, who broadly identified that while these matters diverted from traditional pathways, opportunity for effective engagement remained and the diversion could be justified by the increased efficiency and certainty the alternative proposal offered.  Infrastructure was also a core focus of the submissions, which generally identified that it needed to be addressed in a more holistic manner taking into account existing infrastructure and infrastructure providers, and the allocation of capex and opex.

MBIE has produced a useful “summary of the summary”, which can be found here http://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/housing-property/urban-development-authorities/document-image-library/Summary-of-submissions.pdf.

It is not clear where the UDAP will go from here.  The new government campaigned on, and has subsequently discussed the establishment of, an Affordable Housing Authority which would be an urban development authority with a focus on delivering housing.  However, whether the UDA model proposed earlier this year will form the basis for the establishment of that authority remains to be seen.  We are following this closely and will keep you informed as news comes to hand.


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